Greyhound - Ted

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Ted’s road to recovery is not going to be straightforward, however, he has landed himself the most loving of homes for the rest of his life.

Please meet Ted – the most wonderful, gentle and stoic rescued greyhound from Ireland.

Ted damaged his Achilles in November last year when another dog ran over the back of his leg mid race, despite the damage, he kept on racing. The extent of his injury was only discovered later and he was dumped by his owners at the Galway SPCA the following morning.

What happenned to Ted prior to rescue is not totally clear, however from what we understand, the orthopaedic vet in Ireland, and subsequent x-rays ruled out fractures, his leg was put in a cast and he was treated with crate rest, strapping and some physiotherapy. His notes recorded that his hock did not drop, indicating that the Achilles did not rupture, and a bad strain was assumed.

Ted did not do well in kennels responding badly to stress and he fell a couple of times and it was decided that foster care in the UK arranged by the wonderful Erin Hounds Sighthound Rescue would the best place for him.

Ted still favours taking the weight off it when at a pause on walks or standing, but appears to be walking and trotting well enough. The tendons of the Achilles have tightened giving the impression that his foot does not touch the floor.

His myotherapy treatment has focussed on settling him into his (now failed!) foster home and on building flexibility and strength to his injured leg, as well as tackling the compensatory issues that have arisen due to his altered gait. 

Further specialist investigation now that he is permanently rehomed has indicated a untreated partial gastrocnemius tendon rupture with the superficial digital flexor tendon remaining intact - and it is the action of the SDFT having to do all of the work, in the case of this partial rupture, that is causing Ted's toes to curl under.

Ted's vets will initially try a calcaneotibial screw to immobilise the hock to allow time for the tendon to reattach itself, however Ted may ultimately end up with a pantarsal arthrodesis - a fusing of the whole of the hock joint, in the future.

Ted’s road to recovery is not going to be straightforward, however, he has landed himself the most loving of homes for the rest of his life and I will continue to provide voluntary myotherapy treatment for the charty, for as long as he neeeds it.  This week he finally lay down for treatment – a massive step in the right direction.