YOUR REHOMED OR NERVOUS DOG

Galen Myotherapy© is capable of affecting animals on numerous emotional levels; treatment can help with nervousness, depression, fear, anxiety, trauma and grief. 

myotherapy and rehoming

Entering kennels for the first time or settling into a new home can be both frightening and unsettling; previously traumatic experiences can remain with a dog, hindering their wellbeing and progress.

Galen Myotherapy© promotes comfort, self-worth, bonding and emotional well-being; depending on their prior situation and previous levels of interaction some rescue dogs can be touch shy and may have developed trust issues surrounding humans.

Treatment can acclimatise a dog to being touched, helping the dog to be more self-aware and make positive associations. It can assist the nervous system in developing new neural pathways that affect how a dog responds to previously challenging situations; eliciting positive responses as opposed to previous learned patterns of behaviour.

Myotherapy is capable of stimulating the autonomic nervous system; specifically the parasympathetic branch, minimising the dog’s ‘fight or flight’ response, lowering anxiety, the level of stress hormone cortisol in the body, along with withheld muscular tension. 

On a physical level, myotherapy relaxes muscles, eases tension and resolves any compensatory or loading issues within the musculoskeletal system the dog may have developed and which may be making the dog irritable and tense, inhibiting their ability to adjust to new situations.

As with all Galen Myotherapy© treatments you will be shown a range of techniques you can use at home to positively impact on your dog’s wellbeing and reinforce new patterns of behaviour.

To talk to me about Galen Myotherapy© and how it might help your rescue dog re-adjust, contact me here.

CANINE RESCUE CENTRES AND WELFARE CASES 

I am more than happy to take on a number of welfare cases; supporting rehoming charities and rescue organisations and will consider every case independently when my workload permits.

My particular interest lies in the rehabilitation of running dogs, lurchers and ex-racing greyhounds who’s working life may have been impaired by racing injury, repetitive muscular strain and overexertion. 

All forms of sporting injury take their toll on a body, and the canine athlete is no different; an ex racer will have accumulated numerous repetitive muscle stresses and strains including ligament and tendon damage during their short but demanding career.

Regular training sessions between weekly 30 second bursts of intense racing, counter clockwise around an oval track ensures that few racing greyhounds escape their career without musculoskeletal injury. Leg fractures, toe injuries, muscle tears and excessive muscle tone can lead to chronic long term issues.

The muscles of a racing greyhound most vulnerable to injury are those placed under extreme stress during propulsion; accelerating out of the starting box or driving around the turns. Changes to muscle structure as a result of repetitive strain can lead to excessive muscle tone. A hypertonic muscle still functions; contracting as normal, but unable to extend to its former length, creating further strain on its attachment or adjacent muscles and frequently leading to injury. To function optimally, a muscle has to be able to stretch fully to allow the limb to extend fully. Overcompensation and excessive tension within the neck and behind the shoulders can lead to a locking up of the thoracic section of the spine, impeding effective function of the radial nerve.

All of these injuries begin with a muscle that tightens excessively and becomes unable to stretch fully or extend the limb comfortably – these effects could be minimised by regular myotherapy treatment.

Prior to or following rehoming, treatment can identify muscle regions still affected by trauma, hypertonic muscle or scarring as a result of the dog's racing career; resolving issues which may have become chronic, enabling them to move more comfortably and freely.

Myotherapy’s ability to stimulate the autonomic nervous system, minimises the dog’s ‘fight or flight’ response, lowers anxiety and withheld muscular tension. The treatment’s ability to elicit change in all of the dog’s body systems enables it to play a highly significant role in the welfare, wellbeing and longevity of any ex-racer.

If you represent a rescue or rehoming organisation and would like to discuss how I could support your work now or in the future, contact me here.

myotherapy and the nervous dog

All dogs can display signs of anxiety and fear; they may not be the same as our own anxieties, but can cause stress and physical reactions just the same.

When a dog is appears fearful, it is instinctively demonstrating apprehension to a person, object or situation it perceives as threatening. Whether real or otherwise; the dog’s autonomic nervous system; specifically the sympathetic branch is preparing the body for the fight or flight response. 

This is a normal canine behavioural response, essential for the dog’s survival or adaptation to its environment – the context of the response is what determined whether the fear is real, perceived, normal or inappropriate.

The majority of abnormal responses are ‘learned behaviours’ which can be un-learned with appropriate gradual and safe exposure, behaviour modification or advice and assistance from a behaviourist.

Dogs can display anxiety to numerous situations and stimuli such as noise, smell, separation, travel, confinement, touch and the unfamiliar.

When dogs become nervous or anxious, they may engage in repetitive or displacement behaviours to relieve their stress such as pacing or excessive grooming or biting themselves.

Anxious dogs can become destructive, vocalise by barking excessively, foul inside the home or crate or demonstrate aggression toward people, dogs or other animals.

Punishment or aversive techniques will do little to stop anxious behaviour; punishment does not address the source of the dog’s anxiety. The suppression of any displacement behaviour through dominance will only exacerbate the problem, as pain, emotional or physical will only serve to increase the dog’s level of stress and uncertainty.

Myotherapy treatment can promote comfort, bonding and emotional well-being; acclimatising a dog to being touched, helping shy or mistrustful dogs learn to accept human touch and build their confidence.

Galen Myotherapy© is capable of stimulating the autonomic nervous system; specifically the parasympathetic branch, minimising the dog’s ‘fight or flight’ response, lowering anxiety, the level of stress hormone cortisol in the body, along with withheld muscular tension. 

Treatment can help your dog to make positive associations. It can assist the nervous system in developing new neural pathways that affect how a dog responds to previously challenging situations; eliciting positive responses as opposed to previous learned patterns of behaviour.

To talk to me about Galen Myotherapy© and how it might help your dog, contact me here.